Innovation in Elder Justice is on the Horizon

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), “Elder abuse is a single or repeated act, or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust, which causes harm or distress to an older person.”

In a study conducted by the WHO in 2017, it was estimated that 15.7 percent of people aged 60 or older experienced some sort of abuse, such as physical, verbal, emotional and/or financial, when the WHO reviewed collected data from 52 studies in 28 countries. Of note, in institutions such as nursing homes and long-term care facilities, 2 out of 3 staff members reported committing elder abuse within the past year. The WHO described abuse in institutions to include, but not be limited to, “physically restraining patients, depriving them of dignity (for instance, by leaving them in soiled clothes) and choice over daily affairs; intentionally providing insufficient care (such as allowing them to develop pressure sores); over- and under-medicating and withholding medication from patients; and emotional neglect and abuse.”

The need for innovation and transformative procedures is highly desired in the elder community. In a press release issued last month by Senators Cory Booker and Bob Menendez, they announced that Rutgers’ Institute of Health, Healthcare Policy and Aging Research School is setting out to change those statistics and was permitted over $1.4 million in federal grants from The Elder Justice Innovation Grants which was established by the Administration for Community Living (ACL) in 2016. In their joint press release, Sen. Booker and Sen. Menendez agreed that Americans should not have to worry about falling prey to exploitation and abuse as they age, especially when suffering from an incurable disease such as Alzheimer’s.

The funding is required to be put towards the advancement of protection of elders with debilitating diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and dementia and anyone who could be the subject of neglect, abuse and financial exploitation. The main goal behind the federal grants is to enhance the services available to our elderly citizens through elder communities, and by initiation of studies on how to reduce the likelihood of elder abuse. While, this grant program is in its infancy still, the possibilities for future overhaul on the way we care for our aging citizens is limitless.

Our attorneys at Walton Law, APC work daily to get the justice for our clients that they deserve after having their dignity, and choice taken away through insufficient care, medication issues and emotional neglect. If you or a loved one has been deprived of the needs that have been agreed upon and paid for, please contact us today to discuss your situation. We are here to help!

 

Walton Law, APC is a San Diego boutique law firm dedicated exclusively to representing injured parties in the areas of personal injury, nursing home abuse and neglect, and financial elder abuse. We only represent people – not insurance companies – and take pride in our reputation for obtaining full and fair compensation for our clients while providing personalized client service. If you believe somebody you know has been a victim of elder abuse in San Diego, CA, please call (858) 384-3320 or visit us online for a free and confidential consultation.