Articles Posted in Selecting a Nursing Home

In our last post, we suggested tips for confirming that a potential skilled nursing facility or residential nursing home has the appropriate staff to address the needs of elders with dementia. To recap, dementia is a syndrome in which there is deterioration in memory, behavior and thinking. This causes many who suffer from dementia to lose the ability to perform their regular activities. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, though there are multiple types of dementia.

Elders suffering from dementia need special care when they move into a long term care facility such as a California nursing home. If you are considering helping to move a loved one with dementia into a nursing home, there are specific questions you will want to ask about the services provided for your loved one.

Questions should include:

According to the World Health Organization, dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependency among older people. Dementia, which is a syndrome in which there is a deterioration in memory, behavior and thinking, causes many who suffer from it to lose the ability to perform their regular activities.

Elders are stricken with dementia far more than any other age group. In many cases, dementia can lead to an elder moving into a longterm care residence, such as a nursing home. If you or someone you know is considering placing an elder suffering from dementia in the care of a nursing facility in California, there are certain questions you’ll want to ask of the facility.

In this post, we will specifically talk about what to look for in terms of the staff of a skilled nursing facility or nursing home. In a subsequent article, we’ll talk about other facility services you’ll want to inquire about.

For many families the decision to help a loved one move into a long-term care facility is difficult. With elder abuse cases on the rise, it is understandable if you have concerns about a particular nursing home that you’re considering for yourself or your loved one.

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Although the decision may be necessary, you’ll obviously want to ensure that you’ve selected the most reputable facility available. To help you in the process of searching for the perfect long-term care facility for your loved ones, here is a list of helpful questions to ask of the facility’s administrators and staff.

*What is the staff to resident ratio?

bigstock-Middle-aged-man-holding-cardbo-12848081-300x200The decision to place a loved one in a long-term care facility for the elderly can be a very difficult and emotionally demanding process. Both you and your loved one need to take an active role in the decision to maximize the health, safety and well-being of your loved one. Once you have narrowed down your search and thoroughly researched and toured the facility, you should consider the following set of guidelines put together by California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform to ensure your loved one receives the best possible care and treatment.

1. Support your loved one’s transition to the care facility. Open communication is extremely important while your loved one transitions to their new home. There may be feelings of loss or abandonment by the person being placed in the facility, as well as mirrored feelings of guilt or neglect by the person assuming responsibility for the placement. Therefore, it is important to openly discuss these feelings. Make sure your loved one receives a comprehensive assessment upon admission and be attentive to any changes in needs, behaviors, attitudes, and affections during the transition.

2. Make your visits count. Vary your visiting schedule by going on different days and at different times. This will ensure you are able to meet various members of the staff, and observe how your loved one interacts with other residents and staff members at different times of the day. Also, make a plan before each visit. Try to discover new things, meet new residents and staff members, explore new areas of the facility, plan special events outside of the facility, and bring with you important talking points and your loved one’s special interests.

If your loved one is suffering from dementia, you should be sure that any nursing home you may be considering is equipped to care for dementia patients, thus allowing for a more beneficial experience for the patient, not to mention a safer one.

Dementia is caused by damaged brain cells, which leads to a deterioration in cognitive abilities, including memory, speech, and dementia-in-women-300x169understanding. Numerous diseases lead to dementia, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease, which accounts for 70% of all dementia cases. Other diseases leading to dementia include Parkinson’s disease and vascular disease.

In choosing a home for a dementia patient, you should first carefully evaluate the skills and background of the staff. Understaffing and poorly-trained staff are severe problems in California nursing homes due in part to the rise in the sheer number of patients, but also to health facilities cutting corners to improve profit margins. Staff should be trained specifically in dealing with the symptoms of dementia so that they are aware of the special needs involved. You should inquire about the kind of training staff members receive, whether the training is ongoing, and whether staff is trained in handling the sometimes difficult behavioral characteristics of dementia patients. Finally, excessive administering of psychotropic drugs to patients is a problem that has become rampant in California and across the nation. You should also inquire about the facility’s practices in this regard, and ensure that it follows California and federal law prohibiting off-label use of medications.

As a nursing home abuse and neglect lawyer, one of the most common questions is, “how do I choose the right nursing home for my loved one?” Unfortunately, there is rarely an easy answer to this question. However, there are some important guidelines listed below that I believe will assist you in selecting the most appropriate nursing home for you or your loved one.

Make a List:

XPages-Handling-disabled-Checkboxes-700x300-300x129Similar to any other big decision in life, there is no substitute for doing your homework and acquiring as much information as you can. Start by making a list of the nursing homes in a community close to relatives, friends, and/or people that will visit your loved one while in the nursing home. To obtain a list of nursing homes, you can contact your local California Department of Public Health District Office. Alternatively, California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform maintains an online nursing home guide that is very helpful.

ISE_webbanner_768x180It is an unfortunate fact that elder abuse is a common and growing problem in San Diego and throughout the United States. Abuse of the elderly can take many forms, ranging from neglect and abandonment to physical, verbal, financial, and even sexual abuse. Fortunately, professionals in health care are constantly working towards new breakthroughs in treatment and the prevention of abuse in the elderly population. It’s true that new research and techniques are changing the face of convalescent care every day.

As the population of elders in San Diego continues to grow, it’s also encouraging to see the elder abuse epidemic be drawn out of the shadows and into the light, so we can all learn to recognize symptoms of elder abuse, and report any suspicions. One such example of shining a light on elder abuse prevention will be coming to Southern California next month.

On September 15, 2016 the 2-day USC Judith D. Tamkin International Symposium on Elder Abuse will welcome “researchers, academics, physicians, nurses, and psychologists” to participate in a weekend committed to “Closing the Research Gaps and Moving the Field of Elder Abuse Forward.”

beating-holiday-depression-270.jpgAs the holidays approach, countless San Diego residents will share the seasonable spirit alongside their family, friends, and loved ones–many of which are elder and may reside in a nursing home. For others, the holidays offer a once-a-year opportunity to check in on the health and wellbeing of the loved elders in our lives.

The best way to ensure that your elderly friend or family member is safe, happy, and healthy is to equip your self with the appropriate facts and information. The Center for Elder Abuse has compiled a helpful fact sheet to review as you venture home for the holidays and spend time with your loved elders.

Here are a few tips, signs, and questions to consider that may help you determine whether the home aid, nurse, or nursing home staff is properly caring for your elderly loved one:

• Do you notice any significant changes in how he or she is spending money?

• Does your loved one seem afraid of or hesitant around his or her caregiver, roommate, or nursing home staff member?

• Does he or she appear thin, frail, overly tired, or have any unexplained cuts, bedsores, bruises, or injuries?

• Does your loved elder appear to have poor basic hygiene; are their hair or nails overgrown, do they appear unshowered; do they wear the same clothes over the course of several days?

• Does your loved one have easy access to their everyday assistance items–such as glasses, hearing aids, dental hygiene tools, walkers or wheelchairs, medications, etc.?

• Is there evidence–mail, e-mails, or phone messages–that indicates he or she has been the target of solicitations, aggressive telemarketers, online/by-mail contests, or other scams?

• Has he or she suddenly stopped participating in a long-time activity, club, or hobby they were once devoted to?

• Does your loved one appear lonely, depressed, or otherwise withdrawn or isolated from their friends, neighbors, and/or community?

• Are your loved one’s pets nourished, clean, and cared for?

As our elderly friends and family continue to age, it is essential that loved ones take an active role in ensuring their care does not fall to the wayside. Whether your loved one lives alone, in a nursing home, or with the help of a home aid–be sure to ask these questions during your holiday visits this year.

If you suspect an elder residing in the San Diego area is the victim of a senior scam, negligence, nursing home abuse, or other forms of elder abuse, contact an experienced elder abuse attorney and discover the recourse available to you.
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Psychological abuse, also referred to as emotional abuse, can be difficult to notice at first glance. The damage often reveals itself in the form of changed behavior, as opposed to physical bruises and marks. It’s important to know that abuse can happen anywhere the elderly person resides, even in a nursing home or other long-term care facility, and can be sustained by any type of caregiver (paid, unpaid; professional, amateur). The National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA), directed by the U.S. Administration on Aging, states, “most cases of elder abuse are perpetrated by known and trusted others, particularly family members (including children, spouses, and others).”

Examples of psychological abuse by caregivers, friends, or even family:

• Screaming or yelling;

Orlando-Nursing-Home-Abuse-Attorney.jpgAccording to a recent study conducted by Cornell University, 1 in 5 nursing home residents suffer abuse at the hands of their fellow residents. The study is the first of its kind in collecting data on resident-to-resident abuse. The behaviors observed in the study include physical and sexual violence, verbal aggression and hostility, invasions of privacy, and other negative and inappropriate interactions.

Using data gathered from more than 2000 nursing home residents across ten different facilities, researchers determined that those that perpetrated these abusive behaviors were often cognitively impaired, but more mobile than their fellow residents. Over a four-week period, Cornell researchers observed and interviewed elder residents, and distilled statistical data from reports and questionnaires completed by staff:

• 16% of nursing home residents have been victims of verbal abuse from other residents, including instances of swearing and yelling.
• 10.5% of elderly nursing home patients report invasive behavior from other residents, such as un-permitted room entry and rifling through the personal possessions of others.
• 6% have suffered from physical abuse, like hitting, kicking, and/or biting.
• 1.3% reported sexual abuse, including indecent exposure, inappropriate contact, and efforts to exact sexual favors.

Presenting at the Gerontological Society of America’s Annual Scientific Meeting in 2014, Dr. Karl Pillemer noted that resident-on-resident abuse is “widespread and common in everyday nursing home life,” and that elderly residents suffering from conditions like dementia may act out with “verbally or physically aggressive behavior,” resulting in “arguments, shouting matches, and pushing and shoving, particularly in such close, crowded quarters.”

A particularly troubling aspect of this study is the lack of action on the part of nursing home staff. Across the country, including in San Diego and the surrounding Southern California area, elders suffer frequent abuse of all kinds from their fellow nursing home residents, and staff reports only a fraction of these altercations. Police are sometimes called to handle instances of theft or assault between residents, but many elderly nursing home residents lack a personal advocate to ensure that justice is delivered and their best interests are served.

If you suspect that your loved one in the San Diego or Southern California area is suffering from elder abuse, either from fellow residents in his/her nursing home or from nursing home staff, take action. Get in contact with a trusted professional who can assess your case and ensure that no abuse is ever repeated. Have your concerns addressed and resolved by a knowledgeable and experienced San Diego nursing home abuse attorney.
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