Articles Posted in Depression

Each year, more than one in three seniors sustain falls, which result in serious injuries. In some instances, falls are the result of elder or nursing home abuse. But in other instances, falls are purely accidental. An experienced San Diego attorney specializing in elder abuse or nursing home abuse, to include neglect, can help you distinguish if an injury from a fall was an accident or caused by the negligence or wrongdoing of another.

As we age, the likelihood of being diagnosed with a medical condition or disorder requiring prescription medication(s) is almost guaranteed. Because of this, far too many elders run the risk of being over-medicated, or experiencing dangerous side effects which increases the risk that an elder may fall. Many seniors are prescribed medications that have dangerous interactions when taken in conjunction with other medications.

To reduce the risk of experiencing potentially dangerous prescription interactions, it is recommended that seniors use caution when taking prescriptions or even over-the-counter (OTC) medications.

When an elder (defined as anyone over the age of 65) falls down, injuries can range from minor bumps or bruises to serious injuries, including bone fractures or even brain injuries. Studies have also shown that even minor falls which produce minute injuries can cause once active elders to become fearful of another fall. Thereby leading them to reduce or eliminate activities they once enjoyed, which can then lead to depression and isolation. Fortunately, there are simple steps that San Diego elders can take to prevent falls, or at least reduce the chances of a fall.

5 Common Factors that may increase a San Diego elder’s chances of falling include:

  • Prescription Medication

A diet made up of healthy foods is necessary to maintain health and well-being. It can also help reduce factors that can contribute to falls.

Some common conditions, which may lead to elders falling in a Southern California nursing home include:

  • Dehydration

beating-holiday-depression-270.jpgAs the holidays approach, countless San Diego residents will share the seasonable spirit alongside their family, friends, and loved ones–many of which are elder and may reside in a nursing home. For others, the holidays offer a once-a-year opportunity to check in on the health and wellbeing of the loved elders in our lives.

The best way to ensure that your elderly friend or family member is safe, happy, and healthy is to equip your self with the appropriate facts and information. The Center for Elder Abuse has compiled a helpful fact sheet to review as you venture home for the holidays and spend time with your loved elders.

Here are a few tips, signs, and questions to consider that may help you determine whether the home aid, nurse, or nursing home staff is properly caring for your elderly loved one:

• Do you notice any significant changes in how he or she is spending money?

• Does your loved one seem afraid of or hesitant around his or her caregiver, roommate, or nursing home staff member?

• Does he or she appear thin, frail, overly tired, or have any unexplained cuts, bedsores, bruises, or injuries?

• Does your loved elder appear to have poor basic hygiene; are their hair or nails overgrown, do they appear unshowered; do they wear the same clothes over the course of several days?

• Does your loved one have easy access to their everyday assistance items–such as glasses, hearing aids, dental hygiene tools, walkers or wheelchairs, medications, etc.?

• Is there evidence–mail, e-mails, or phone messages–that indicates he or she has been the target of solicitations, aggressive telemarketers, online/by-mail contests, or other scams?

• Has he or she suddenly stopped participating in a long-time activity, club, or hobby they were once devoted to?

• Does your loved one appear lonely, depressed, or otherwise withdrawn or isolated from their friends, neighbors, and/or community?

• Are your loved one’s pets nourished, clean, and cared for?

As our elderly friends and family continue to age, it is essential that loved ones take an active role in ensuring their care does not fall to the wayside. Whether your loved one lives alone, in a nursing home, or with the help of a home aid–be sure to ask these questions during your holiday visits this year.

If you suspect an elder residing in the San Diego area is the victim of a senior scam, negligence, nursing home abuse, or other forms of elder abuse, contact an experienced elder abuse attorney and discover the recourse available to you.
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Elderly woman in pain
Psychological abuse, also referred to as emotional abuse, can be difficult to notice at first glance. The damage often reveals itself in the form of changed behavior, as opposed to physical bruises and marks. It’s important to know that abuse can happen anywhere the elderly person resides, even in a nursing home or other long-term care facility, and can be sustained by any type of caregiver (paid, unpaid; professional, amateur). The National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA), directed by the U.S. Administration on Aging, states, “most cases of elder abuse are perpetrated by known and trusted others, particularly family members (including children, spouses, and others).”

Examples of psychological abuse by caregivers, friends, or even family:

• Screaming or yelling;