ISE_webbanner_768x180It is an unfortunate fact that elder abuse is a common and growing problem in San Diego and throughout the United States. Abuse of the elderly can take many forms, ranging from neglect and abandonment to physical, verbal, financial, and even sexual abuse. Fortunately, professionals in health care are constantly working towards new breakthroughs in treatment and the prevention of abuse in the elderly population. It’s true that new research and techniques are changing the face of convalescent care every day.

As the population of elders in San Diego continues to grow, it’s also encouraging to see the elder abuse epidemic be drawn out of the shadows and into the light, so we can all learn to recognize symptoms of elder abuse, and report any suspicions. One such example of shining a light on elder abuse prevention will be coming to Southern California next month.

On September 15, 2016 the 2-day USC Judith D. Tamkin International Symposium on Elder Abuse will welcome “researchers, academics, physicians, nurses, and psychologists” to participate in a weekend committed to “Closing the Research Gaps and Moving the Field of Elder Abuse Forward.”

man staring out windowWe all have family members that we love and want only the best for. As our parents and other family members reach an age where they may need assisted living or an in-home nurse, the last thing we want to worry about is neglect or abuse. Although stories of abuse suffered by elders at the hands of nursing home staff, or as the result of neglect, there are rarely reports of patient on patient abuse. However, a June 2016 study published by the Annals of Internal Medicine online reveals that more nursing home patients may be suffering from abuse at the hands of their fellow residents than previously known.

This new study from the Annals of Internal Medicine aims to shed some light on the much overlooked issue. When asked if a patient had encountered abuse, 1 in 5 residents stated they had in the past month. This is significant, because it not only shows that 20% of nursing home residents experience abuse, but is possibly indicative of a routine problem of systematic abuse.

Most commonly, the abuse suffered by elder victims is being on the receiving end of a verbal assault or being witness to behavior that would be considered unacceptable in nearly every public situation. Specifically, the study describes this form of abuse as “negative and aggressive physical, sexual, or verbal interaction between long-term care residents that in a community setting would likely be construed as unwelcome and have high potential to cause physical or psychological distress in the recipient.” Although most encounters were verbal, the study also revealed incidents of physical and sexual abuse between residents.

locked-houseWhen considering types of elder abuse, neglect and abandonment often come to mind. It is an unpleasant fact however, that elder abuse can and does take many different forms. Financial abuse, for example, can often be just as devastating to a victim as neglect or even physical abuse is. When a person on a fixed income is taken advantage of financially, these victims typically have little to no means of recovering their assets. This is particularly true of elders in Southern California, who are often defenseless or unaware of potential threats— making them easy prey for scammers.

In a case that’s garnered a lot of media attention, two convicted felons were recently charged with holding an 84-year-old woman against her will along with stealing money from the woman and her husband. Here’s an overview of that story:

In August of 2015, 53-year-old Wayne Kim Golden, and his girlfriend, 52, made an agreement with the 84-year-old victim to house her 94-year-old husband with Alzheimer’s, who needed full time in-home care. At some point, Shillings showed up at the female victim’s home in Menifee where the victim still lived independently, and took her back to the residence in Perris where Shillings and Golden cared for her husband. Once at the home, Shilling confiscated the 84-year-old’s car keys and check book, and held her hostage in her home for two weeks.

evictionAccording to a recent report from the Associated Press, elderly residents of nursing homes who are considered to be challenging to care for are often targeted for eviction, and sometimes abuse. Those advocating on behalf of elderly nursing home residents, as well as the disabled elderly, argue that nursing home staff and caregivers are sometimes unwilling to meet the challenges certain elderly residents and patients present, and so steps are undertaken to have these elderly residents evicted from their nursing home facilities.

The goal of these unlawful evictions, advocates argue, are to minimize attention required by staff and to maximize nursing home profits, by switching out need-intensive patients for those who require less direct attention. Some argue that those with involved families, or with families who have complained about prior mistreatment of their elderly loves ones, are also targeted for nursing home evictions.

Another unfortunate detail of this report is, most often the victims of these evictions come from economically disenfranchised backgrounds, and are frequently suffering from dementia. Complaints about these unlawful discharges and evictions are up by 57% since the year 2000. The study reported that, “Complaints and lawsuits across the U.S. point to a spike in evictions even as observers note available records only give a glimpse of the problem.”

Neglect is one of the most common forms of senior abuse in San Diego and around the country. According to the California Department of Public Health’s Nursing Home Residents’ Rights, malnutrition constitutes a form of neglect, and thus—elder abuse.

Nursing homes in San Diego have a legal responsibility to ensure that residents are properly nourished. Nursing home staff must monitor residents during mealtime to ensure that all residents are being properly fed. Likewise, failure to provide appropriately nutritious meals is a serious form of senior neglect.

Warning signs, symptoms, and indications that an elderly loved one in San Diego could be suffering from malnutrition as a result of a neglectful or abusive caregiver or nursing home staff member, include:badfood

scam-onphoneThe National Council on Aging (NCOA) has called financial abuse in elders “the crime of the century,” due to its prevalence in the senior community. In San Diego, as in the rest of the country, seniors are often directly targeted for financial scams—frequently through telemarketing schemes—that prey upon the weaknesses of the elderly.

There are various types of financial and telemarketing schemes that target the elderly, including:

  • Investment Schemes

Each year, more than one in three seniors sustain falls, which result in serious injuries. In some instances, falls are the result of elder or nursing home abuse. But in other instances, falls are purely accidental. An experienced San Diego attorney specializing in elder abuse or nursing home abuse, to include neglect, can help you distinguish if an injury from a fall was an accident or caused by the negligence or wrongdoing of another.

As we age, the likelihood of being diagnosed with a medical condition or disorder requiring prescription medication(s) is almost guaranteed. Because of this, far too many elders run the risk of being over-medicated, or experiencing dangerous side effects which increases the risk that an elder may fall. Many seniors are prescribed medications that have dangerous interactions when taken in conjunction with other medications.

To reduce the risk of experiencing potentially dangerous prescription interactions, it is recommended that seniors use caution when taking prescriptions or even over-the-counter (OTC) medications.

When an elder (defined as anyone over the age of 65) falls down, injuries can range from minor bumps or bruises to serious injuries, including bone fractures or even brain injuries. Studies have also shown that even minor falls which produce minute injuries can cause once active elders to become fearful of another fall. Thereby leading them to reduce or eliminate activities they once enjoyed, which can then lead to depression and isolation. Fortunately, there are simple steps that San Diego elders can take to prevent falls, or at least reduce the chances of a fall.

5 Common Factors that may increase a San Diego elder’s chances of falling include:

  • Prescription Medication

Each year, more than one in three elders in San Diego falls, with serious injuries resulting. In some instances, falls are the result of elder or nursing home abuse. But in other cases, falls are purely accidental. If an elder you love has sustained a fall inside a San Diego nursing home, contact an experienced San Diego elder abuse and neglect attorney to help determine if the fall was caused by the wrongdoing or negligence of another.

Although falls may not be entirely preventable, there is evidence that shows that incorporating balance exercises into an elder’s physical routine may help to reduce their likelihood of sustaining a fall.

Senior woman having ambulatory therapy
How Balance Exercises May Benefit San Diego Seniors

Each year, more than one in three seniors in San Diego sustain falls and serious injuries. In some instances, falls are the result of elder or nursing home abuse and/or neglect. But in other instances, falls are purely accidental.

More and more elders (defined by California statute as those over the age of 65) are choosing to reside in their own home versus living in an assisted living facility or with relatives. Although there are wonderful reasons to live in your own home as long as possible, it’s important to note that elders are at risk of suffering injuries from a fall, which often times could have been prevented.

Typically, falls are responsible for 60% of in-home injuries. However, statistics show that programs to help prevent falls in the home are effective.